lunes, 26 de abril de 2010

Americana



The next Costume Institute Gala, happening May the third 3rd will be about American fashion; "American Women". As usual Anna Wintour will be chair as well as Patrick Robinson from The Gap and Oprah Winfrey, from The United States of Oprah. That red carpet, at least for me, it's the most expected. I never really care what everyone is wearing to film award ceremonies, because most of the attendants are boring and safe.

That's honestly my general opinion on American fashion as well, but I do have some expectations about what everyone would be wearing, and hopefully get to see a lot of Rodarte. The whole American fashion theme seems to be a nice idea for a post. I do not like American fashion today, but we have to thank them for their contribution, sportswear and separates.



Since the Industrial Revolution, United States was the first coutry that jump into the boat of making clothing an industry, and not something crafted in ateliers by couturiers or dressmakers as it still was being done in the rest of the world. That creations were often standarized, since they had to fit a range of women, and thats how sizing begun.



It was also easier and more comfortable for women to start wearing separates, skirts with blouses and jackets and much later, pants. The american way of dressing influenced the rest of the world and still does. The way denim became mainstream and now everybody wears it, as well as flip-flops, track suits and basic t-shirts. Well that may not sound glamorous and something to be proud of at all, but it's what real people wears.



American fashion has also had great designers, and a cool way of portraying their society in a certain period of time, through the way of dressing. Halston succed dressing the hedonist glamazon of the 70's as Calvin Klein did with the minimalist woman of the 90's. along with; Bill Blass, Ralph Lauren and Oscar de la Renta (though not born in the US) they have elevated American fashion to the level of the European capitals.

Photos are: Vogue November 1999 cover, Beverly Jonhson by Irving Penn, Anjelica Huston and Lauren Hutton by Richard Avedon from Vogue January 1973.